The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas

The Hate U Give was recommended to me by a friend who has recently read it. When I read the summary on B&N, I was intrigued and knew it was a book that would hook me. I followed the author, Angie Thomas, to find out more about her. She’s from Mississippi, guys. I was wrapped up through the summer with my book club read and had a hectic few months. When I finally was able to start the book, it definitely took me for an emotional ride.

The story is told from the point of view of Starr Carter, an African American teenager torn between two different worlds. Although she lives in a neighborhood with drugs and gang violence, her parents pay dearly to send her to a prep school. She is the Starr from the hood at home. She’s laid back, uses slang, and speaks her mind. Starr at her prep school seems more uptight, uses proper English, and has a white boyfriend. She is hassled by peers from her neighborhood about her new school.

Her father owns a store in their neighborhood and is an reformed drug dealer. When his children were born, he changed his ways and although he was not always there to be the best father, he does the best he can for his kids now. Maverick, or Big Mav, has a gift for saying the right thing in the right moment. I envy him that. He makes no qualms about his belief system and how he sees the world. That made him one of my favorite characters.

Starr’s mother is a strong woman who expects a high moral standard from her children. She’s a nurse so nurturing comes natural, and she has backbone to spare. Her relationship with Maverick has a not so great history, but it has persevered.

Starr is no stranger to gun violence. She lost a friend at the tender age of ten to a drive by shooting. This makes it all the more painful when she sees her friend gunned down by a police officer. While he’s driving her home, they fall victim to racial profiling that leads to her friend, Khalil, being shot multiple times. He dies in the street with her by his side.

The next weeks are very taxing for Starr. She has many decisions to make as to what to say to the police, the DA, and to the media. While she tries to defend her deceased friend who can no longer defend himself, she also has to go up against the word of the officer and local gang members who want to keep her quiet. She blooms from a terrified teenager who wants to hide from what happened to a revolutionary activist.

This is the debut book by Angie Thomas. I am inspired. I appreciated her way with dialogue and the dynamics between characters. One minute, I was ugly crying about the injustice of racial America, and the next giggling at Starr’s humor. I can’t wait to see how Angie Thomas evolves over time. There is a wind of change blowing through YA, and Ms. Thomas is a part of that. I am very proud to see it.

I loved that Starr had a boyfriend, but it wasn’t a together forever kind of relationship that is dominant in YA. They had a regular, healthy relationship. Starr was somewhat rebellious like a normal teen but had consequences to face. She finally realized that her two worlds could come together. This is the unity we need in America right now. Starr was brave and in my opinion, is a modern day hero. 

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