Books of August

This summer I wanted to read more. I wanted to open physical books and feel their pages, listen to them and what they had to say, or see their words on my phone and tablet. I got my first free Audible book and remembered what I love about listening. Since, I’ve spent hours engulfed in audio. Realizing that my Kindle Unlimited allowed me to listen to audio books of several of the books in my list has upped my game.

I’ve had a craving for stories. Not just fiction but nonfiction and stories in all their forms. I’ve started a few books only to determine that now is not their time for me or they don’t catch my interest. I’ve set them aside for later. However, as far as reading goes, August has been successful.

Jurassic Park

I finally finished Jurassic Park in August even though I started in July. In my humble opinion, it was so good. I finished the last fifteen chapters in two days. I enjoyed it so much and found the movie to be lacking afterward. Every reader knows that the book is always better.

I loved the kids in the book. I loved that Ellie was so fearless. I would have liked to have seen her have a little more adventure. The descriptions of the dinosaurs were great. I did have to Google a few names to get a better visual in my mind.

Jurassic Park is the first movie I remember seeing in theaters. I remember clutching my popcorn and being on the edge of my seat, pointing and exclaiming. I was 6 or 7 at the time. Once my brother was a little older, I passed on my love of dinosaurs to him. He got his dinosaur fix with the Land Before Time movies. I still like watching Jurassic Park from time to time. It was innovative at the time of its release. It “spared no expense.”

 

The Overdue Life of Amy Byler cover

 

I also finished listening to The Overdue Life of Amy Byler by Kelly Harms. It was good, and I liked it. However my fears of it being very chick lit were confirmed, I still enjoyed it. I love the idea of an overworked mom getting a #momspringa.  I appreciated the relationships. I liked how the main character, Amy, dealt with things and her children. I loved that she was a librarian, teacher, and bibliophile. There was just something about the book that I couldn’t love even though I wanted to. I would still recommend it to my chick lit loving friends.

 

 

 

 

I listened to the audio book of I’m Fine and Neither Are You by Camille Pagan. This one I also almost loved, but not quite. I enjoyed it, liked it, and would recommend it to ladies I know like this kind of book. Life is the bad guy and stomps around making life miserable for the protagonist. It had one twist that I didn’t see coming, but after that is pretty predictable. It also came across as very chick lit as well. It reminded me a lot of  The Overdue Life of Amy Byler in that there was a New York trip and was also narrated by Amy McFadden.

 

 

I’m currently listening to The Storyteller’s Secret by Sejal Badani. I’m not quite half way through and am already sure this is one I’m going to love. The story is flowing well, the narrator does a nice job, and I’m really getting attached to the characters. The story is looking to be one that is both sad and sweet. Set in India, it is about a woman who travels there to find out more about her heritage. It has a “finding myself” as well as “self healing” feel. The writing is beautifully descriptive. I’ve had to stop several times to highlight a line that really jumped out at me. I’ll update more when I finish.

I’m also just starting to read The Opposite of Everyone by Joshilyn Jackson on Kindle Unlimited. One of my all time favorite books is Gods in Alabama. This book is already very Joshilyn Jackson. Her characters always have certain quirks that makes them more believable. That’s one reason she’s a great author.

I could learn a lot from her, I think.

I’m reading more and feeling more like my old self. I’m going hardcore with my nutrition so that helps. Life has been flowing these past few weeks. I’m just riding the current.

Happy Reading.

 

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Teaching

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When I first started college over ten years ago, I thought I wanted to teach. I had this fantastic World Civ teacher that made me want to combine my love of history with teaching. However, after a time, the introvert in me whispered, “Do you really think you can handle that many people day in and day out?” She had a valid point. I mean if I took online classes to keep away from too many people in a classroom, what made me think I could teach in one?

Needless to say, I did not become a teacher. However, I kinda did.

I work in a small town computer repair shop. Our owner has been in the business for 28 years and has built a loyal customer base. People come from all over because she’s built a solid reputation for being the best. Our customers love her down to Earth nature, plain spoken honesty, and brilliant mind. So do I. I’ve learned a lot from her and learn something new daily. I tell her all the time that I only thought I knew something about computers before coming to work for her. Plus, I have a huge appreciation for working for a woman owned business.
My job didn’t begin as working on computers. With most of the jobs I’ve had, I’ve prided myself on knowing how to do more than I was hired for. Six years ago, I started out helping customers and ordering stock mostly. Soon, the focus of my job was bookkeeping and office managing. As I picked up more and more computer knowledge, I’ve started assisting with IT and repair.

I can’t explain how rewarding it is to work in IT. We offer remote support for home and business. It’s a great feeling to be the comforting voice on the line reassuring someone that the computer that runs their livelihood is not dead, can be fixed, and no, all your hard work and files are not lost to the void. We work with all manner of people from the 85 year old grandmother who just wants us to show her how to upload pictures of her grand kids to Facebook to complicated business networks with specialty software. We are privileged to work with veterans who have been gravely wounded or lost their sight defending our country. Making their lives a little easier in any small way is very rewarding.

One of the best parts of my job is that I remotely teach the elderly how to use their computers. I get excited when people call and remember what I taught them the last time we spoke, even if it’s something as simple as changing their Facebook photo. One of the oldest customers I assist just turned 92.

Recently, a customer introduced to me to her daughter as her “computer girl.” She said, “You know that thing I do where I scan and email you pictures? Kacie taught me how to do that.” Their pride for accomplishing something just makes my day. I feel like I’ve accomplished something as well.

It’s refreshing to teach people who want to learn. Their zest and drive to understand something that seems so complicated to them is refreshing. Teaching is very rewarding whether it’s in a classroom full of students or one on one at a desk. My boss says, “If you stop learning, you’re dead.”

I’m glad to be teaching and glad to be making some small difference in the lives of those we help. It makes me feel hopeful if I can give someone who is lost a little direction. Fulfilling work that you enjoy is important to living a happy life. Mine, at the moment, is the happiest it’s been in a while.

Summer Reading Update

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I haven’t gotten to see this view this year, but I’ve been staring at this photo I took several years ago and dreaming.

I’m realizing that I don’t stick to my reading lists. It’s much the same as buying a book that I’m excited to read and getting distracted by another book before I even begin the first. I am notorious for this.

I began reading Jurassic Park a few weeks ago. I’ve been thinking it would go better as an actual book read rather than ebook. I’ll probably check in with the library to see if they have it. I’m not sure exactly why I wanted to read it other than it caught my attention while scrolling through books. I loved the movie as a kid, and I’ve been looking to read outside my box. I’m really enjoying it. I like Sci Fi movies, but I’m ashamed to say that I’ve never read much of it. Recommendations are appreciated.

This is me rectifying my reading sins.

After Where the Crawdads Sing, I’ve began listening to The Overdue Life of Amy Byler by Kelly Harms. When I first started it, I was worried because it came across as very chick lit. There’s nothing wrong with chick lit, but I just don’t tend to enjoy it. However, the humor caught me. I think I’m beginning to appreciate chick lit more as I get older as long as it’s funny or smart. The voices the narrator uses has me chuckling. It seems like what I call a good palate cleanser. It’s something fun and refreshing after a heavy read.  I’ll update more when I finish or at least get further along.

Let me just say that all Mississippians have been offended by the heat. We are fed up and over it. Even for Mississippi, this is ridiculous.

I haven’t been doing as much writing in recent weeks. I’ve been focusing on reading more. Most writers agree that a lot of reading makes for a better writer.

I’ve got several books on my radar. Some of which I am looking forward to listening to on Audible. Maybe if I read books set during the fall of the year, I can convince myself that I’ll get to experience it soon.

Where the Crawdads Sing

Read on. No spoilers.

I’m rediscovering audiobooks. My first true experience with them was in 2013 when I listened to The Hunger Games series. I enjoyed it so much because I was driving a good bit. It’s definitely different than just sitting down with a book and easier to manage on the go. Then, I drifted back to the wonderful world of bound pages and digital.

I listened to Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens this week. A friend told me it was terrific, one of my bookclub friends loved it, and Amazon kept recommending it to me. Finally, it was Audible that caused me to give in. WtCS became my first Audible book, and it was free.

It took me about a week to finish. I listened in the shower, quiet mornings at home, on the drive to work and home again, and even during the slower moments at work. I sat at my desk with one earbud perched in my ear, the other ear listening for the phone or customers.

I was captivated by Ms. Owens’ descriptions of the marsh land where the book is set as well as her explanation of the local animals. I love a good story, but I love it even more when I learn something.

The main character, Kya, really touched me. Her circumstances were so undeserved with her kind, tender heart. She reminded me of myself in ways. It brought back my childhood spent running through pastures, playing in the garden, and wading in the creek. She liked being alone and on her own. I get it completely.

The book begins with her childhood in the 1940’s. The characters are well thought out. The story is mountains and valleys of highs and lows. This quiet, outcast girl educates herself and lives a life that the rest of her town does not comprehend. I loved that about this book.

The narrator, Cassandra Campbell, does such a great job. I love that her voice changes for each character. I love that she conveys the emotions and reactions so well. I was pleased to find that she does a lot of narrating. I’ll for sure be listening to more from her.

I would recommend this book. It was an easy read although the conflicts in Kya’s life had me holding my breath. The coming of age aspect of this book is broken and beautiful. Kya’s story is imperfect and kept me absorbed from beginning to end.

Talk on Indolence

“Well I’ve been lockin’ myself up in my house for sometime now
Readin’ and writin’ and readin’ and thinkin’
And searching for reasons and missing the seasons.
The Autumn, the Spring, the Summer, the snow.
The record will stop and the record will go.
Latches latched the windows down,
The dog coming in and the dog going out.
Up with caffeine and down with a shot.
Constantly worried about what I’ve got.
Distracting my work but I can’t make a stop
And my confidence on and my confidence off.
And I sink to the bottom and rise to the top
And I think to myself that I do this a lot.
World outside just goes
It goes it goes it goes it goes it goes”
– The Avett Brothers, Talk on Indolence
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As of late, I’ve recognized so much with the lyrics above. I’ve been a level 368 introvert, and I’ve been loving it. I enjoy seeing family and friends, but lately I’ve been enjoying my own company. I’ve worked hard at convincing myself that it’s perfectly fine for me to do so.
The older I get the more that I find myself getting overstimulated around people. I’ve always been one to shy away from touch. Now, voices, smells, and loud laughter seem to grate on my sensitive nerves. The anxiety really gets to me.
Earlier in the summer, I made a list of books I wanted to read over the slow months of debilitating Mississippi heat. I am half way through the first on my list, and done with one that I found because of a song. I found my favorite band, The Avett Brothers, through a book. I found a book that I was really sucked into because of a song. I’ll get to that shortly.
I’ve barely noticed the last two months slipping by. Suddenly it’s August, and I realize that the second half of the year is upon us. The second half is always my favorite. In Mississippi, we have summer and then extended summer before about a week of fall. I live for that week. I become what my book club girls call “basic” during the last half of the year.
I’ve been really indolent lately. I’ve been doing exactly what the song says, “readin and writin and readin and thinkin”
I finished Mud Vein by Tarryn Fisher. I’ve heard of her several times in the same circles as Colleen Hoover. I put her in the Rolodex in the back of my mind to read one day. Although I confess, I thought she wrote romance, and she does, but not like I was thinking. I found Mud Vein while looking up the song Landscape by Florence + the Machine. That’s when I saw comments about people finding this song because of the book. When I checked out the book, I read the summary and thought it might be interesting.
Let me just say that this is not a read for you if you are a sucker for happy endings. Also, not if you enjoy likable characters. If you like unusual stories about broken people struggling to get by and exist in this messed up thing we call life under almost unbearable circumstances, this might be for you. The protagonist is a writer that keeps her own company. I know a little something about that. It’s a dark read.
I’ve been reading a lot of those lately.
All in all, the first half of 2019 has not been kind. Being a recluse is a coping mechanism. Reading and writing and reading and thinking are survival tools. Everyone has their own way of finding their peace, and these are mine.